Photography

 Spotted: the Sri Lankan red tuk tuk in its natural habitat.

Spotted: the Sri Lankan red tuk tuk in its natural habitat.

 Minutes before I was close enough to hear an elephants breath.

Minutes before I was close enough to hear an elephants breath.

 Tea village near Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka, home to the Tamil minority group.

Tea village near Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka, home to the Tamil minority group.

 The Sisters of the Holy Spirit and Mary Immaculate convent in San Antonio, Texas is home to about 70 nuns. The majority are Irish immigrants who came to the U.S. as teenagers to teach in schools founded by Mother Margaret Mary Healy-Murphy, whose portrait fills the halls of the convent.

The Sisters of the Holy Spirit and Mary Immaculate convent in San Antonio, Texas is home to about 70 nuns. The majority are Irish immigrants who came to the U.S. as teenagers to teach in schools founded by Mother Margaret Mary Healy-Murphy, whose portrait fills the halls of the convent.

 Sister Jo Murray, age 85 (left), and Sister Gabrielle Murray, 80, grew up on a dairy farm in rural Ireland with their eight other siblings. Since entering the convent at 18, they have both traveled the world as teachers and nurses to help communities in need. They credit their mother, Josephine Murray, who never got the education or adventure she dreamed of, for making sure her daughters had better opportunities.

Sister Jo Murray, age 85 (left), and Sister Gabrielle Murray, 80, grew up on a dairy farm in rural Ireland with their eight other siblings. Since entering the convent at 18, they have both traveled the world as teachers and nurses to help communities in need. They credit their mother, Josephine Murray, who never got the education or adventure she dreamed of, for making sure her daughters had better opportunities.

 Sister Jo Murray attends a daily mass before dinner. The Sisters of the Holy Spirit convent, once filled with over 100 young girls, now doubles as an old folks’ home. Today, the median age of the community is 77. Despite their fading way of life, many of the Sisters are at peace with their future. “If God wants us to continue in a different way,” says Sister Jo, “that’s ok with me.”

Sister Jo Murray attends a daily mass before dinner. The Sisters of the Holy Spirit convent, once filled with over 100 young girls, now doubles as an old folks’ home. Today, the median age of the community is 77. Despite their fading way of life, many of the Sisters are at peace with their future. “If God wants us to continue in a different way,” says Sister Jo, “that’s ok with me.”

 There are three different shifts at Hideaway that go into the production of a loaf of bread: the mix shift, to get the dough ready; the shape shift, to cut and size the different kinds of dough; and the bake shift, when everything goes into the oven.

There are three different shifts at Hideaway that go into the production of a loaf of bread: the mix shift, to get the dough ready; the shape shift, to cut and size the different kinds of dough; and the bake shift, when everything goes into the oven.

 Pletscher has been baking bread for 11 years, the past five of those at Hideaway. "I like the tangible nature of it,” he says. “I get to play with squishy stuff all day, and just go into the zone and do my own thing."

Pletscher has been baking bread for 11 years, the past five of those at Hideaway. "I like the tangible nature of it,” he says. “I get to play with squishy stuff all day, and just go into the zone and do my own thing."

 A recent graduate of the University of Oregon School of Music, Pletscher says his time as a baker is coming to an end. He says he’ll miss being part of an ancient tradition people have been doing for thousands of years, as well as the physical nature of the job. “To me,” says Pletscher, “it’s more like sculpture than culinary art.”

A recent graduate of the University of Oregon School of Music, Pletscher says his time as a baker is coming to an end. He says he’ll miss being part of an ancient tradition people have been doing for thousands of years, as well as the physical nature of the job. “To me,” says Pletscher, “it’s more like sculpture than culinary art.”